Here is 51 second verbal home run scored against our current administration.

I’m sick and tired of hearing about Obama and the White House coming out with yet another crisis that has to be fixed by government sticking it to the people and taking more of what we earn and produce. Instead of allowing our small businesses, especially, to keep more of what we earn and produce, and then reinvest according to our own priorities. So that we can grow and thrive and hire more people. That’s how we create jobs. That’s how the economy will get roaring back to life.

But see, too many in the White House, including our own president, I don’t know when they have run a business. I don’t know when they have been a CEO of anything where they’ve had to look out for the bottom line, and they’ve had to make payroll and live within their own means with a budget. You know, they’re from government. They’re community organizers. They’ve been spending other people’s money for so long that I think a lot of the free enterprise principles that so many of us believe in, it’s all foreign to them.

For someone whom the liberal media tells us is dumber than a box of rocks, former Governor Palin understands better than this administration how the economy works and grows, and it isn’t from the government spending money while lurching from one crisis to another.

John Nance Garner, the 32nd Vice President of the United States, once summed up the office of the Vice President as being “not worth a bucket of warm piss.” But if you were asked about the duties of the Vice President, could you name them? Here is a video of Republican Vice President candidate Sarah Palin responding to the question of a third-grader — “What does the Vice President do?”

“A Vice President has a really great job because not only are they there to support the President’s agenda, they’re, like, the team member — the team mate — to that President, but also they’re in charge of the United States Senate. So if they want to, they can really get in there with the Senators, and make a lot of good policy changes that will make life better for Brandon, and his family, and his classroom. And it’s a great job, and I look forward to having that job.”

This hands-on approach to the Senate is getting some people on the left upset, as reported on the completely impartial and non-biased *snicker* news organ, CNN:

The comments have drawn criticism from Democrats and liberal blogs which note the actual role of the vice president when it comes to the Senate is simply to cast a tie-breaking vote in the event of a stalemate. According to Article I of the U.S. Constitution, the vice president is the “President” of the Senate, but has no executive position when it comes to presiding over the chamber.

Donald Ritchie, a historian in the Senate Historical Office, told CNN that Palin’s comment was an “overstatement” of what her role would be.

“The vice president is the ceremonial officer of the Senate and has certain ceremonial functions including swearing in new senators and can vote to break a tie,” he said. “It’s a relatively limited role. It’s evolved into a neutral presiding officer of the Senate.

Ritchie also noted recent vice presidents have played a behind-the-scenes lobbying role on Capitol Hill for an administration’s policies, but called it “somewhat limited.”

Let’s read exactly what the Constitution says on the role of the Vice President, as it relates to the Senate:

The Vice President of the United States shall be President of the Senate, but shall have no Vote, unless they be equally divided.

That’s it. Notice how the article does acknowledge that the VP is the President of the Senate, but does so by putting it in quotes, like the VP isn’t really President, the VP is only “President.” (Free tip for Alexander Mooney and other aspiring journalists: scare quotes have no place in a serious news story. You’re welcome.) Anyway, the learned opinion of Mooney continues: “but has no executive position when it comes to presiding over the chamber” as if that were actually stated in the Constitution itself. But as you can see, it isn’t.

The VP is free to be as hands-on or hands-off the Senate’s day-to-day activities as he or she desires. The only official responsibility a VP has is to cast the tie-breaking vote, but what stops the VP from mingling with the Senators and persuading them to vote one way or other? The only thing that would stop the VP from doing that is the VP. Did you notice that historian Donald Ritchie admitted as much in his above quote, about how recent VPs have played a “behind-the-scenes lobbying role on Capitol Hill for an administration’s policies”? I see that as being exactly what Palin is talking about when she said a VP could really “get in there with the Senators.” And interestingly enough, she isn’t the only person who claims that power.

The same article quotes the Democrat Vice President candidate, Joe Biden, as saying pretty much the same thing as Palin: “I hope one of my roles as vice president will be as the person actually implementing Barack Obama’s policy. You gotta get the Congress to go along with it.” And how exactly do you get the Congress to do that? Well, you could try to “really get in there” with them.

Palin says it, and CNN responds that she is misstating the role of Vice President. I can envision them murmuring, “Dumb ol’ Sarah.” But Biden makes a similar statement, and there is no sanctimonious head-shaking at his comment over at CNN. That’s why I have to laugh every time I think of CNN’s claim to be impartial and non-biased in their reporting.

Frankly, if I were given the choice between a CNN interview or a bucket of warm piss, I’d take the bucket.

In September, Senator Obama said the following to a crowd in Elko, Nevada:

“I need you to go out and talk to your friends and talk to your neighbors. I want you to talk to them whether they are independent or whether they are Republican. I want you to argue with them and get in their face,” he said.

I initially thought this comment was rather thuggish on Obama’s part. After all, the mainstream media is firmly in his camp, so getting his philosophy out there shouldn’t be that big of a concern for him. But I didn’t think that Obama supporters would really do it.

Then my wife pointed out something she noticed on a craft-related site — posts about hand-crafted pro-Obama or anti-Bush items usually get at least polite responses, even if they’re along the lines of “Love the idea. But he’s not who I’m voting for.” But when someone posts a hand-crafted McCain/Palin shirt, the responses were certainly “in their face,” enough that a moderator had to jump in several times and remove abrasive comments.

Is this proof that Obama fans are meaner than McCain fans? No. These are merely three samples, and the plural of anecdote is not data. What we have here are polite responses from people who disagree politically on the one hand, and on the other hand enough seething rage to require moderator intervention. It’s not proof, just a few points of data. One of the points of data is a political candidate asking for his supporters to “get in their face.” But I’m sure this rage is merely a coincidence.

Coincidence or not, enough people have spotted this rage on the part of leftists that it has a name, “Bush Derangement Syndrome,” and its recent viral twin, “Palin Derangement Syndrome.” It’s odd that I don’t see this seething anger on the conservative side. Even during the worst of President Clinton’s scandals, I didn’t hear many conservatives boiling over in rage. It’s true that many conservatives disapproved of his behavior or the policies he proposed, but those dislikes didn’t, for the most part, translate into a personal hatred of Bill Clinton the man. But I have observed a visceral hatred of conservatives in general and President Bush in specific from numerous people on the left.

Not everyone sees it that way. Paul Krugman says he is frightened by the specter of rage on the right: “Something very ugly is taking shape on the political scene: as McCain’s chances fade, the crowds at his rallies are, by all accounts, increasingly gripped by insane rage. It’s not just a mob phenomenon — it’s visible in the right-wing media, and to some extent in the speeches of McCain and Palin.” Really? What rage is that? Can you show me pictures or video to demonstrate this rage? At most there are people shouting out words like “traitor” and “terrorist” at Senator Obama at rallies for the McCain/Palin ticket. But where is the rage?

If you want to see graphic examples of rage, Michelle Malkin has compiled some on her site. (Warning: some are profanity-rich and graphic.) Malkin also nails this idea of rage from the right in a recent syndicated editorial:

Are a few activists on the Right getting out of hand? Probably. Between massive ACORN voter fraud, Bill Ayers’ and Jeremiah Wright’s unrepentant hatred of America, and John McCain’s inability to nail Barack Obama on his longtime alliances with all of the above, conservatives have plenty to shout about these days.

But a couple of random catcallers do not a “mob” make. And there’s an overflowing abundance of electoral rage on the Left that won’t make it onto your newspaper’s front page.

She then goes on to list some of the rage from the left — not that you’re likely to hear about it in the nightly news or read it in newspaper because it’s not news. After all, the news media knows that leftist rage is justified because many of them share that rage. Besides, if they don’t report it, it’s not news, right?

“I want you to argue with them and get in their face,” said Senator Obama. The order has been heard and is being obeyed. So which group is filled with rage? My guess is that they’ll be getting in your face very soon.

Two things came up this week that make me question the judgment of Democrat Presidential candidate, Senator Obama. First, he used a old phrase that has caught fire in the news.

“You can put lipstick on a pig. It’s still a pig. You can wrap an old fish in a piece of paper called change. It’s still gonna stink. We’ve had enough of the same old thing.”

People say that he was talking about the Republican Vice President candidate, Gov. Sarah Palin, but Obama maintains that he was only using a common phrase, and not targeting her at all. I question Obama’s judgment because I see two possibilities behind this phrase:

A) Obama really meant to call Palin a pig, which is sexist language, even for a Democrat, and certainly poor judgment.

or

B) Obama really wasn’t thinking of Palin, but it is easily misconstrued by others to refer to her. He should have the good judgment to recognize how his words could be viewed by others.

In either case, Obama shows a lack of judgment in the use of this phrase.

The second thing that came up this week comes from Senator Biden, Obama’s Vice President candidate, as he was singing the praises of Senator Clinton.

“She’s a truly close personal friend, and she is qualified to be President of the United States of America. She’s easily qualified to be Vice President of the United States of America, and, quite frankly, it might have been a better pick than me.”

I love how Ace of Ace of Spades HQ summed up Biden’s comment:

Barack Obama’s judgment was that Joe Biden was the best possible vice presidential candidate.

Joe Biden says he’s wrong.

This was Obama’s first major decision as a would-be president.

He got it wrong.

Yes, Obama got it wrong. He got it wrong with his Vice President pick, and he got it wrong with using the lipstick on a pig comment. And if he is making bad judgment calls at this point in the election, what sort of judgment will Obama have in the midst of a high-pressure crisis while President? I shudder to think about it.

So, yes, I do question his judgment.

It’s hard to pick up a newspaper or look over a news website today without seeing at least one, if not many, articles about Alaskan Gov. Sarah Palin since Sen. McCain selected her to be his vice presidential running mate. The Sunday edition of our newspaper source of coupons is yet another example of the current liberal media hype. “Inside Palin’s turbulent first year as mayor,” it announced in large bold type. Turning to page A18 to continue the article, I discovered that the story filled the entire page. A sub-heading stated, “She demanded loyalty from department heads.” Boy, I hope so. It would be really stupid to surround yourself with employees who don’t like you or follow your policies.

I really don’t have a horse in this race. There isn’t a hope in hell that I would vote for Sen. Obama and his love affair with Marxism, but Sen. McCain doesn’t thrill me, either. I was surprised at Gov. Palin’s selection because I hadn’t heard much about her before the announcement. And unless you are a political news junkie and/or live in Alaska, it’s probable that you hadn’t heard her name more than five times before either.

I find it interesting that for the small amount of Palin news coverage in the lower 48 states, it didn’t take long for the liberal left to develop a seething hatred for her. You’d think that the self-proclaimed champions of women would applaud a successful woman like Palin, but she isn’t a liberal woman, so she doesn’t count. And so it’s full speed ahead with the politics of destruction. I had to laugh when someone at work told me that she couldn’t support Palin since she didn’t write her own acceptance speech. “She’s just parroting the talking points from the right!” she explained to me. Never mind that my co-worker was just parroting the talking points from the left.

Yes, the left is all abuzz with hatred and rumors about Palin. (If you are having a hard time keeping up with them, I suggest visiting Charlie Martin’s numbered list of rumors, followed by the truth.) As my wife pointed out, “It’s as though all the freight train of hatred and derogation earmarked for Bush has leaped the track and headed for Palin instead.” And I agree. Lefties who have been fully afflicted with “Bush Derangement Syndrome” are now testing positive for “Palin Derangement Syndrome.” Michelle Malkin has been doing a good job of reporting examples of PDS on her site. While you are there, I strongly suggest that you read her excellent article about the four stages of conservative female abuse.

My wife has suggested that Republicans should always be in control of the country, for the simple reason that they encourage journalists to do their jobs–the liberal-dominated media will carefully scrutinize everything conservatives do, whereas they tend to give liberals a pass on all but the most heinous activities. This explains why it took so very long for the media to investigate Sen. Edward’s admitted infidelity. Regardless of my opinion of the left-leaning full-page article in today’s fish-wrapper, the 96 column-inches of story prove that the media can do investigative journalism. But it seems to happen only when they are politically motivated to do so.

The political buzz is not about Senator Obama’s nomination by the Democrat party last night. Instead it is about Senator McCain announcing Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin as his Vice President candidate today. I don’t know what the polls will say, but I’ll bet that there won’t be much of a bounce for Obama as there will be for McCain.

Gov. Palin is younger than Obama, and has served less time as governor of Alaska than Obama has served as Senator, but there is a difference: Palin has seven years of executive experience as mayor and governor, while Obama has none.

Yes, liberals will bring up her inexperience, but that is a two-edged sword that can cut Obama deeper than it will cut Palin. If she is asked about her inexperience in a debate or news conference, she could respond in this way: “While it’s true that I am younger than Senator Obama, I bring seven years of executive experience to the position as compared to Senator Obama’s none. I would say I am better prepared for an executive position than he is.”

While I was completely wrong in my guess 20 months ago about who the Democrat and Republican candidates would be, I still stand by this paragraph:

Since the office of President is an executive position, it makes sense that people elect proven executives to that office. This could explain why so many state governors have been elected President (G. W. Bush, Clinton, Reagan, Carter, F.D.R., Coolidge, Wilson, T. Roosevelt, McKinley). That makes nine the last time I counted them — nearly 50% of our Presidents since 1900. And whether the state is large or small, the office of Governor is an executive position. With all else being equal, I would prefer a candidate with proven executive experience over a legislator any day (but when do we ever have two candidates that are close to equal in belief and position?).

Of the Democrat and Republican candidates, only the Republican ticket brings executive experience to the job.